Book review: The World of Pooh: The Complete Winnie-the-Pooh and The House At Pooh Corner

It is amazing how much of Pooh sticks with you over the years.

I had a longing to revisit Winnie-the-Pooh and managed to get my hands on the complete works of Pooh by A. A. Milne. I remember one particular Pooh book from my youth: the one where Pooh visits Rabbit and gets stuck in his doorway. This story is included in the complete works.

The Pooh stories were clearly inspired by a young boy and his teddy bear. Originally in the stories the bear was named Edward Bear but quickly referred to as Winne-the-Pooh. Milne created these stories to entertain a real Christopher Robin who dragged his stuffed bear around.

The stories in Winne-the-Pooh contain the original cast of characters: Pooh, Piglet, Eeyore, Kanga and baby Roo. The House At Pooh Corner introduces Tigger to the Hundred Acre Wood. Christopher Robin is always popping in and out of the stories. He lives in a tree in the forest but is often out doing things and only occasionally joins the other inhabitants in the forest.

The stories were a delight to reread. I remember most, if not all, of the various chapter-length tales—the game of Poohsticks, Roo’s Strengthening Medicine, Eeyore losing his tail. This odd collection of friends is timeless. They do not age and frankly neither do you. Like Christopher Robin in the stories, you can pop in to visit them at any time and it feels like no time has passed since you last interacted with them.

Pooh and his friends seem like archetypes—I always thought that they each represent different aspects of ourselves. Rabbit the know-it-all. Owl the wise and knowledgeable. Kanga the kind mother. Roo the overexcited youngster. Eeyore the perpetually depressed. Piglet the anxious and fearful. (Well, he is a Very Small Animal after all.) Tigger the exuberant lover of life. Pooh the calm, humble bear who accepts all. (My favorite was always Tigger who is quite bouncy.)

I was surprised that in addition to the stories, I remembered the dialogue. Milne had a way with witty banter. I often found myself laughing out loud at exchanges between characters. In one story, Rabbit clearly wanted to be left alone, but he encountered Pooh who wanted to talk. (Who hasn’t been in this situation before?) “Hallo, Rabbit,” [Pooh] said, “is that you?” “Let’s pretend it isn’t,” said Rabbit, “and see what happens.” (page 106)

Other times, Pooh, a Bear of Very Little Brain, says something quite profound. Piglet, who is always nervous and worried, asks Pooh a question as they are walking in the forest. “Supposing a tree feel down, Pooh, when we were underneath it?” “Supposing it didn’t,” said Pooh after careful thought. Piglet was comforted by this. (page 272)

Other times he clearly is not too bright. As Piglet observed, “Pooh hasn’t much Brain, but he never comes to any harm. He does silly things and they turn out right.” (page 122). He cannot remember left from right. He knocks on the door to his own house, mentions that it is taking the occupant forever to answer, and then is reminded that it is his own house. He falls into his own trap for the mythical Heffalump. But he is a true and tried friend to all with a heart of gold.

The last story in the collection is sad—a collective good-bye to Christopher Robin who is clearly going off to school and putting his group of stuffed animals aside to Grow Up. But the nice thing is that the group did not grow old. The inhabitants of Hundred Acre Wood are still there, visiting each other to wish a Happy Thursday or doing simply Nothing. You can join them any time you need a break from Being an Adult.

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Asking questions

Quote

“Once you have learned how to ask questions—relevant and appropriate and substantial questions—you have learned how to learn and no one can keep you from learning whatever you want or need to know.” ~ Neil Postman and Charles Weingartner, Teaching as a Subversive Activity

I tend to ask lots of questions in an effort to understand things. But I’ve discovered that a cohort of people really, really dislike being asked questions (and the people who ask them). Happily, there is another cohort of people who really, really like being asked questions and sharing their knowledge. I’d prefer to live in a world populated by the latter folks.

Movie review: Citizenfour (2014)

Citizenfour left me feeling confused and unsettled. Has it really been five years since the Snowden leaks? Has it really only been five years since the Snowden leaks? After the bru-ha-ha died down, did anything change? Were any programs stopped? Was our privacy restored?

After all is said and done, was it worth it? Was it worth Snowden giving up his life to go public with information about government programs that violate, if not laws and our Constitution, then the spirit of America?

Watching Citizenfour and the assumption that the revelation of this data would change the world was deeply saddening. The end game is also quite ironic: idealist American fighting for privacy, freedom, and the curtailing of government powers ends up living in a profoundly unfree autocratic state (Russia).

The documentary was filmed by Laura Poitras, one of the journalists that Edward Snowden initially approached about sensitive government information that he acquired during his work at the NSA. She films the initial days of meeting with Snowden through the initial days after the revelations went public. What would be interesting would be a follow-up: So what happened or changed in electronic surveillance since that time?

Poitras films Glen Greenwald and Ewen MacAskill from The Guardian meeting with Snowden in his Hong Kong hotel room. What is the information that he has? What does it mean? How best to disseminate it? How to communicate electronically but safely?

Citizenfour also shows other meetings and talks, such as Snowden meeting with human rights lawyers as he was seeking to flee Hong Kong or William Binney, a former NSA crypto-mathematician, talking to the German Bundestag after Snowden’s revelations.

The information that Snowden revealed basically showed that the US is hoovering up data from anyone and anything in the world, with telecoms as accomplices. The US, in the grand tradition of authoritarian regimes, is seeking to acquire as much knowledge of the population as possible as a method of control. (A tactic eerily similar to Putin and his intelligence agency roots.) If democracy dies in the darkness, it also dies without privacy and the accompanying freedoms of thought and expression.

As Greenwald points out in a talk to the European Parliament, the US is engaged in electronic surveillance not for national security. National security is just a convenient bogey-man—fear is a tool in the compliance toolbox. Rather gathering this data and monitoring people is in the industrial, financial, and economic interests of companies. It comes down to, I would say, power and money.

I still am not entirely sure how I feel about the leaks or Snowden. It is not clear to me that he is a criminal or a martyr, just someone who was living his conscience and his conscience wouldn’t let him sit by as the government betrayed our trust and the Constitution.

Since he went public with the information he had, I have no proof that things have gotten better. In fact, I assume that they have only gotten worse or accelerated and that the US has improved its techniques and its reach into our lives.

Knowledge is power but in a twisted way I am not sure that making the knowledge public was empowering. There was nothing the public could do about it. Instead, knowledge as power speaks exactly to what the US government is doing: control and power through the accumulation of information about the people.